Moondogs

by Daniel Kirk
Putnam, 1999
Moon Dogs

Book Description
There are amazing-looking dogs on the moon! Young Willy knows because he has been watching them through his telescope. When his dad suggests he ought to have a pet, Willy builds a rocket just his size, and sets off on the adventure of a lifetime. Willy’s heart is set on finding a dog like you’ve never seen before and readers will be surprised to see what he brings home!

Reviews of Moondogs

Review from Kirkus
A deliberate sense of the absurd infuses Kirk’s story of a boy and his dog with great humor and appeal. As always, the palette is robust and retro, with images that are invitingly participatory,

Daniel Kirk speaks about Moondogs
Lots of times, good ideas pop into my head when I am on vacation. While visiting friends in Vermont, I found myself looking into the night sky with a little girl named Grace.
[expand title=”Read More”] “What do you think is up there?” I asked. “Is the moon made of cheese? Is there a man on the moon?” Just then one of the family’s big dogs ran by. “Are there dogs on the moon?” I asked, and Grace laughed.

I wrote the first few lines of Moondogs that night.

Moondogs is one of my favorite books. I loved inventing all the funny-looking dogs that live on the moon. It was a challenge to make the characters look very weird, and still have them look like dogs! I also loved drawing the man in the moon, and exploring different ways to make him look ugly and scary, but not too strange.[/expand]

Things to think about and do, once you have read Moondogs

1. Do you think Willy really went to space, or did he pretend it?
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2. Do you think there is life on other planets?

3. Draw some moondogs of your own–what do you think a moondog has to have? Antennae? Many eyes? Strange colors and shapes? Extra legs or ears?

4. Make plans for your own rocket ship. Think about how big it would be to hold you and your passengers, and what kinds of things you might need to take as supplies on your journey.[/expand]

  
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